Travel with Curiosity

Primrose Pervades the US Grant Hotel in San Diego: A Historic Hotel’s Connection To The Present

US Grant Hotel in San Diego

US Grant Hotel in San Diego

As a symbol of life, the Evening Primrose breathes life into the high-end US Grant Hotel near the Gaslamp Quarter. Incorporated into the original design of the stair banisters and tiles in the Celestial Ballroom, the Evening Primrose, appropriately enough, is also the symbol of life to the current owners, the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation, according to Marketing Manager Vanessa Randazzo.

Built in 1910 by the son of President US Grant, the property changed hands a few times over the years, even flirting with demolition in the late 1970’s. The Sycuan Band purchased the property in 2003 because of the significance to their ancestors. The hotel sits on land that had originally belonged to them. The Sycuan also saw it as a fitting tribute to President Grant’s legacy as he was the first President to return land to the Indian nations.

CURIOSITY: The hotel sits on the site of the former Horton House which had been built by Alonzo Horton, known as the father of San Diego for laying out the street grid.
Rooms include tastefully appointed standard rooms with furnishings in the Empire style. Each room also includes a hand-painted headboard by Yves Clement.

Standard Room

Standard Room

The 2-story presidential suites on the 9th and 10th floors replace ballrooms from an earlier era. These 1500 square foot suites include a living room, dining room, butler’s pantry, and a second bathroom. French doors lead to a balcony with views over a roof-top garden, which the chef uses to grow herbs.

Presidential Suite

Presidential Suite

The hotel exudes the ambiance of a high-end hotel while the primrose is woven into appropriate places throughout the hotel.

David Montour sculpture

David Montour sculpture

The lobby boasts a sculpture by David Montour of a woman emanating from a primrose flower while the blue and gold carpeting from Thailand in the lobby as well as on guest room floor hallways have also successfully captured this symbol of life.
Prices average $350 for standard rooms and $3500 for the presidential suites.

http://www.usgrant.net/

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